450 N Syndicate St, Suite 315 St. Paul, MN 55104 info@clcmn.org 651-644-4438

Volunteers

Resources for CLC Volunteer Attorneys & Child Advocates

Tickets for Kids

Children’s Law Center of Minnesota is excited to share that we are a Tickets For Kids partner.  Tickets for Kids provides free access for low-income and at-risk kids to attend the arts, cultural, educational, and athletic venues of their community. Our partnership with them allows our volunteers to make trips to museums, concerts, ballgames, science centers, zoos, and more a reality for our clients.  Please visit this list of events (Tip: Search by Minnesota) and email Melissa Wind at mwind@clcmn.org if you are interested in attending an event with your CLC client.

CLC Volunteer Attorney Listserv

CLC has created a listserv Google Group for all our volunteer attorneys. This group is intended as a tool for CLC volunteer attorneys to ask child protection questions and find court coverage from other CLC volunteer attorneys. To join this group, please click here.

 

Announcement of Completion of 18-21 year old Practice Module: Children’s Law Center is intensifying its representation of clients who are preparing for adulthood

Please look at our Preparation for Adulthood Module, with included 2012 legislative updates, created to guide volunteer attorneys representing foster care youth ages 16 and older. The module summarizes the applicable laws for foster care youth in extended foster care and explains the benefits and services that older foster youth are entitled to receive. The module also covers many substantive issues that are crucial to address with older clients, so that they can become successful, healthy adults. CLICK HERE for the Updated 18-21 Module. CLC also created a Preparation for Adulthood Checklist to use with the module. In addition, we have motion templates for attorneys who need to compel the county to provide services or benefits to our clients continuing in extended foster care, ages 18-21. Please contact us if you need a sample motion or if you have any questions.

 

Tips for Helping Children and Teens Before and After Visitation

If the Courts deem it physically and emotionally safe, many children and teens in the foster care system will have Court-ordered, regularly scheduled visits with birth parents, siblings, and other family members. Visits are intended to help children and birth family members maintain and strengthen their relationships during a time of separation. However, without the proper preparation before a visit, or appropriate support following a visit, this can be a challenging experience for all involved. Click here for tips on how you can support your clients with birth family visits.

 

Practice Points

CLC publishes practice points for CLC Volunteer Attorneys and other child advocates who represent children in foster care. These practice points focus on pressing issues for foster care youth, including: placement, education, health, transitioning to adulthood, and many other legal matters pertaining to representing youth in foster care. If you are not currently a CLC Volunteer Attorney and would like to receive CLC’s monthly Practice Point, it will be available as part of the CLC E-Newsletter, which you can sign up for in the newsletter box at the bottom of your screen.

 

Knowing your Rights: A Handbook for Kids in Foster Care

Click to download: Knowing your Rights: A Handbook for Kids in Foster Care, Copyright 2011, Updated 2014, Children’s Law Center of Minnesota, All Rights Reserved.

Special thanks for the in-kind contributions: of Thomson Reuters for printing the “Knowing Your Rights” handbook, and Rea Koren for her graphic design and layout of this handbook.

Please contact CLC for permission before making multiple copies of the Knowing Your Rights handbook, or to request a published copy or copies, please call: (651) 644-4438.

 

MENTORING: Does a Foster Youth that you know need a Mentor?

Each young person should have a caring adult who devotes time to helping them achieve their potential and discover their strengths. Although mentors are not meant to replace a parent, guardian or teacher, they can often echo the positive values parents and guardians should be teaching. Many youth in foster care are unable to identify a caring adult who supports their goals and dreams. If your client could benefit from a mentoring relationship, check out the list of awesome programs available in the Twin Cities! Or call our social worker, Weida Allen, for help finding a program that fits your client’s needs.